“Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.” – Matthew 28:19-20

I am not much of a chef – or a baker for that matter.  If I were going to bake something, I’d need explicit instructions … starting with where to find the baking pans, spatulas and ingredients in my own kitchen!  So the truth is out.  I survive off other people’s cooking 😊

When Jesus told us to go and make disciples of all nations, He didn’t give explicit instructions.  He did instruct us to “baptize and teach,” but as the multitude of Christian church styles and denominations reveals – there is a lot of variety in exactly how to do that.  Virtually every Christian church’s mission statement can be boiled down in one way or another to the Great Commission given by Jesus – “go and make disciples.”  And truly, that is something to be thankful for.  We are all trying to carry out what Jesus left us to do until He returns.

In an attempt to navigate the multitude of methods and strategies of carrying out the Great Commission, several myths about making disciples seem to have developed in church circles.  Using an excerpt from the book “From Followers to Leaders”[1] that I received during my most recent PLI Missional Leader training in Cary, NC in February, let me help us debunk some myths about developing disciples.

Myth: developing disciples is about having the right program to run people through.

The reality is that developing disciples is primarily a relational process centered on the individual, not the system. The most effective starting point is the person, not the program. Whether it was Nicodemus ( John 3:1-21, or the woman at the well (John 4:1-26), Jesus started with the person.  He didn’t tell them that his next training program began in 3 weeks; the signup was in the lobby.  He taught them what they needed to learn when they needed to learn it.

Myth: developing disciples is a synonym for training.

The reality is that training constitutes one small piece of discipleship, and it doesn’t always look like classroom training.  There’s a certain amount of knowledge that needs to be imparted, that is true.  But often the most important things that we learn are better “caught than taught.”  That’s one reason why I love our Wednesday morning prayer and study group.  We may be looking at a passage that we’ve all heard before.  We all “know” it – but we all grow by learning how the other person applies it to their life or the situation being discussed.

Myth: developing disciples correctly means treating them all the same and expecting that they will all turn out the same.

The reality is that each potential disciple has different God-given gifts, capacities, and callings. Developing a quiet intercessor will look very different from developing an international missionary. And it should. Disciples do not all look the same, nor do we all have the same work to do.  (Ephesians 2:10)

Myth: discipleship begins with mature Christians.

The reality is that because we are whole beings, developing disciples is a holistic process. Discipleship actually begins with pre-Christians.  One of the most exciting areas of discipleship that Rachelle and I look forward to exploring in our missional community is bringing pre-Christians into our discussion group alongside more mature Christians.  We won’t all be at the same starting point, but we will all grow together.

Myth: discipleship primarily focuses on skills.

The reality is that skills are only one piece of the whole pie. Effective discipleship takes into account the individual as a personal, social, emotional, spiritual being. Any compartmentalization of these areas of our lives is artificial.  One of the tides and misconceptions in the church that we need to combat is that “church stuff” only happens inside the church.  We need to carry our discipleship into our workplaces, marketplaces and homes.  And we need to allow our members to see personal, social and family interactions as valid places where faith is developed and expressed.

After all, this is how Jesus did it.  Luke chapter 11 starts when Jesus was just doing life with his disciples and one of them said “teach us to pray.”  Luke chapter 6 starts as Jesus was going through the grain fields with his disciples.  It was then that they were ready to learn about the Sabbath, and so it was then that Jesus taught them.

I pray that we are all willing to be used by God in the process of making disciples wherever we are.  May this be a movement that starts now and continues until the Lord calls us home!

Making disciples with you,

Pastor Augie

[1] © 2008, by Robert E. Logan, Tara Miller, and Julie Becker